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I mostly work in the NY Metro area and do "catch / release" work for many different agencies.  Some have written dress policies, other do not.  I always wear a shirt and tie and at times I will wear a suit.  This could be geographic" specific, but I know other videographers who wear golf shirts and casual pants.  Whats your situation?

 

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For my team, we always wear either a suit/dress slacks with a sport coat and no tie, or slacks, dress shirt and tie. Occassionally, we will wear a suit and tie to the deposition, it gets hot here in Oklahoma, so I prefer to have my collar open a bit. :)

When it comes time for trial, we absolutely dress in a suit and tie. Our goal is to look as good as the attorneys we are with.

That being said, many people that I work with in the area wear khakis/polos, golf shirts, or even cargo pants. I've seen this at depositions and at trial.

One of the best compliments that I can get is when I walk into a law firm for a deposition and the receptionist asks if I am an attorney.

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I'm in Miami, Florida. Very hot and humid. We have two types of climate-hot and hotter. I carry a towel with me and  do not wear a suit or tie but wear very nice slacks with custom made shirts. Going from the parking lot to an office with my gear you can build up quite a sweat. Also, too hot to wear a suit and wear a tie when I find myself on the floor taping down electric cords and taping microphones  under the table. As i mentioned, I have custom made shirts with my company logo and my name embroided in about 9 different colors. When I represent an agency other then my own direct billing client I have made generic shirts with only my name. I was working with a client, a while back, on depositions for multiple weeks, and she realized I had various color shirts, not just white. Early on she said to me "what color shirt are you going to wear tomorrow" my answer was you'll have to come tomorrow. I find it very nice when somebody comes into the room and sees my name on my shirt and addresses me by name. They never forget your name when they see it all day long.

Jeff Menton

Valuable Video, Inc.

Miami, FL 33186

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I am with Jeff.  Nice khaki slacks and logoed (mine) dress shirt.  In the summer too hot to wear a coat and tie (I used to) and in the winter one wants a really heavy parka.  It is rare that any of my clients wear a suit and tie to a deposition and I have had lawyers come in dressed as if they were just getting ready to mow the lawn!

That said if I need to appear in court I wear the "uniform" i.e. coat and tie/suit.

 

Edited by John Gianotti

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I am in Colorado.

Shirt and Tie, Always.

Never worked in the Court room.  If that happens then I will go with the Suit first and check things out.

Better to be overdressed then under dressed.

Michael

 

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I believe that you don't want to be dressed better than your client.  They'll get the notion that you're being paid too much.  In Miami you'll never know what to expect. Attorneys wear suits, some don't even wear a jacket or tie and some come in wearing shorts and flip flops. I believe that my clothing fits the situation. When working in the Florida Keys attorneys don't even wear suits when going to court (not a trial). 

Only once in 34 years did an out of town attorney said to me "why aren't you wearing a suit" my response was I don't own one. I suggested to him that if he was't satisfied with the work not to pay the bill. Not only was the bill paid promptly but had a note attached saying that the next time we work together he won't wear a suit either. Turned out that I had a good run with him on the case he was working on. 

Jeff Menton

Valuable Video, Inc.

Miami, FL 33186 

 

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Suit and tie. Yes, it gets hot in the summer in Atlanta; a couple of years ago I switched from traditional cotton undershirts to 32 Degrees Cool undershirts and these somehow magically take care of most, if not all of the sweat. Best thing since sliced bread. 

Am I over-dressed? No! Some attorneys are under-dressed and they should know better - they are intellectuals!

Dressing up shows respect for yourself and for others. 

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Long sleeve dress shirt, tie, all-season wool slacks. Highly polished shoes. No suit, ever.

Why? I don't do court. Am I underdressed? No. I've been a professional all my working career, which is bordering on 35 years. It's how you act as well as how you dress, and I'm a professional from the word go.

I spend way too much time on the ground crawling in people's crumbs to buy a good suit and watch it getting ruined. I have no intentions buying a cheap suit as a cost-saving measure - because there isn't anyone in the room who's ever wearing a cheap suit. They're all wearing really expensive suits -- or shorts, flip flops, or dressed much like me.

It's probably just as much a rural versus urban thing. You live in a big city - I get it. 90% of my jobs aren't big city.

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 Suits, jackets and ties, because most of the videographers here in North Carolina wear them. Most of the work is in Charlotte or other larger cities.  I also would rather be over dressed then under. My feelings are that I am producing a professional product. I am part of that product. My appearance my equipment and my attitude.  In short I know that professional is not just the end product.  

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